New Work: The Nook Table

The Nook table is a small and collapsable with a cabinet that can be accessed through two tambour doors. The components of the table are held together with small wooden wedges. Piercings in the table surfaces reveal evidence of how individual tambour sticks were cut out from the original plywood sheet. Once cut, the individual sticks were joined with a canvas backing to create the final sliding tambour. The tambour rides along a groove and slides to open and close.

The Nook Table

This summer I was lucky enough to take Wendy Maruyama's course at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. This is where the design for the Nook table was conceived. With the utilization of Haystack's CNC router in the Fablab, the components of the Nook table were cut out of a sheet of hand painted plywood. Later, the table was finished in the woodworking studio at San Diego State University, where I am currently a resident artist. 

Above are some photos of the table being built at Haystack. There are few places more inspiring than the picturesque mountainside location of Haystack. The school's campus provides tranquil Maine coastline and great studio facilities. In other words, it's a great place to spend two weeks as a maker. My class was great and Wendy pushed all of us to think outside the traditions of tambour construction. Everyone produced great work over the two week session. My personal goal was to break out of a funk that I had leftover from the final semester of my undergraduate program. Haystack provided the perfect opportunity for me to create something totally new and exciting. 

The collection of work created in Wendy Maruyama's tambour workshop

The collection of work created in Wendy Maruyama's tambour workshop

The design of the Nook Table represents many of my current interests as well as a shift towards a new direction in my furniture. I have found myself more interested in representing elements of infrastructure in my designs. A few examples of this can be seen in the design of this table. Its asymmetrical geometry is a nod towards the chaotic imperfection of the systems we build. Rather than having the tracks for the dual tambour doors fit within the confines of the piece as would be traditionally expected, the right tambour track juts out of the back of the piece. The table puts function first, in this case the function is the tambour door opening. The rest of the design was edited to accommodate this feature. The kink in the profile of the table allows the left side of the table to sit perpendicular to the wall, while the right side is forced away from the wall by the protruding tambour track. 

I also chose to work with the simple geometry of circles and rectangles to give the table a more industrial appearance. Cutting the tambour sticks out of pieces of the table not only creates a unique pattern, it also allowed me to cut down on material needed to create this table. I am interested in the process of cutting out functional components from other parts of the same object. This process becomes all the more interesting when the leftover pattern created from the cut can be used to create ornament. I hope to explore this way of working more in the future. I am also planning to further develop my understanding of how land is populated by infrastructure.

An above view of the Nook Table

An above view of the Nook Table

A detail of the Nook table Joinery

A detail of the Nook table Joinery

A rear view of the Nook Table outside the studio at San Diego State

A rear view of the Nook Table outside the studio at San Diego State

I will most likely be making more work along the line of the Nook Table in the near future. As of now, each object I design is unique and produced entirely by me. If you have questions, inquiries or comments please feel free to contact me anytime at rmorton@meca.edu.